Our Solar System🪐🌍🌠

Sometimes it seems like the sun☀️ is moving. It is not the sun that moves; it is the planets that move. We move, for example, and Mars moves also. Within one to two months, it can move quite far from one part of the sky to the other.

Mars is a planet that has seasons like we do. Not all planets do. Mars actually had water (we found that out in the 1950s and 1960s). Could there have been life? Mars also has two small moons🌕🌖. We have one.

As you know, the rover that recently landed on Mars, Perseverance, made a huge breakthrough by landing on such a rough terrain. It was a first time event that will mark history. It happened last year in August.

It gets so cold on Mars it can be like -100 Fahrenheit. The air is very thin. Your weight on Mars would be one third of what it is here. Mars is called the red planet. There is no “blue” or water anymore.

Mars is actually small. It’s only one fourth of the diameter on earth. It has low gravity. However, billions of years ago Mars was covered in water. So what happened? On earth, wherever water appears, life appears🌊🐃.

Was there life on Mars that disappeared and dried up? The dinosaurs on earth became extinct 65,000,000 plus years ago. The rover, again, Perseverance is searching to see if there was ever life on Mars.

The mission is using a special device to explore the soil. Perseverance will leave tubes of soil on Mars for eight years and then bring them back to earth to detect if there was ever life there.

The sky in Mars is kind of pinkish. Mars is just one sibling planet, though. There are many other planets, so we can begin by looking at planets nearest to the sun🌞. Mercury and Venus are close by.

One difference between Venus and Mercury is that Mercury can get really hot and cold at the same time. There can be a 1000 degree difference between night and day. Mercury is not even the hottest planet. Venus is the hottest.

It’s not as close to the sun as Mercury, but it’s hotter at times. Venus is always 860 F. It doesn’t change. The air is thick; it’s like being half a mile down in the ocean. The pressure is intense. NASA observes Venus from orbit through a radar map.

Most of Venus consists of rolling planes, and it’s kind of like Iowa. There are no oceans. But there are volcanoes. Venus is sometimes called the sister of the earth, but it is incredibly different.

Which planet would you want to go to first, if the time ever comes to send humans to other planets? Let’s take a look at some more planets near the earth. Saturn is famous for its rings around it. Jupiter🪐 is famous for the clouds.

Juno is a mission that’s orbiting Jupiter by NASA. There is at least one mission to every single planet in the solar system. They are all robots; we haven’t sent a human yet. The storms on Jupiter go on for decades and hundreds of years. We suspect there was a storm even going on for millions!

That is a little background on our solar system in our galaxy, the Milky Way🌌. Marvel at all the Lord has done. There are about 125 billion galaxies in the observable universe that we know of so far. But I’m sure there’s more! I believe it’s infinite and that there are multiverses.

The Milky Way is just one galaxy. Scientists estimate that there may be tens of billions of solar systems in our galaxy, alone, perhaps as many as 100 billion. Think about that. Ponder on God’s grandeur! Never doubt his power and magnificence. He holds the galaxies and stars in place; he will hold you together also!

Here is the course offered by Liberty Science center in New Jersey as part of the Varsity Tutors StarCourse series:

About Zina

Zina Hermez authored the best selling book, Not Without God: A Story of Survival. She’s been featured in numerous articles, guest posts, podcasts, websites, newsletters, and magazines. Recently she was featured on ESPN’s ‘Solutions from the Huddle’ broadcast. Zina’s written hundreds of articles and has taught students from all over the world spanning many different backgrounds and cultures. She’s appeared in Christianity Today, the Suite T blog and Southern Writers magazine among other places. She writes on faith, science, and overcoming adversity. Her goal is to help others. You can connect with her on Instagram, Facebook, Linked In, or Twitter.

Modern Medicine StarCourse Series

Today I found a video interview with Dr. Craig Spencer, a famous doctor and member of Doctors Without Borders (one of my favorite groups!). I get so excited when I find celebrities who’ve taught a course for the same company I do. He’s also an ER doctor and professor at Colombia University. Did you know that life expectancy used to only be forty years old? It has now increased to 80 years today.

We live in a golden age of medicine and health. In some countries outside of the U.S., though, unfortunately, life expectancy is still only until the 50s. Thus, birthdays are special. There was always a risk that babies may not make it to their first birthday around the world historically.

We didn’t always know as much about disease before as we do now, either. We used to think everything came from bad air. We didn’t know as much about viruses and germs. For example, surgeons many years ago didn’t put on clean robes as they do now. They didn’t understand that they could bring infection and bacteria with them into surgery.

Much later, they realized going in like that does patients a disservice. Infections after surgery were commonplace many years ago. A doctor, Joseph Lister, came up with the idea that germs were the reason for infection, not the air or “spirits” in the hospital. He started sterilizing and made surgery safe. Because of him, surgery has continued.

No access to clean and fresh water is one of the main reasons for poor health even nowadays. We have to sterilize water. You may notice that countries with a flawed water system have more illnesses such as cholera, etc. Believe it or not, salt and sugar save lives! Because sugar mixed with water and a little bit of salt helps prevent dehydration.

The last health tip I will share (from the interview), is everyone needs a good bug spray! We don’t suffer much from malaria in the U.S.; however, the most threatening insect is a mosquito. We still deal with it in other countries throughout the world. Bugs carry the most bacteria.

Regarding vaccines, first and foremost, they do their best to prevent infections—especially certain types of conditions. Vaccines are as “old” as the US and were first used in the fight against smallpox. The last case of smallpox was in 1949. The only disease ever fully eradicated.

Now I will pass it over to Brian Galvin (Varsity Tutors) and Dr. Craig Spencer. Just click on the link to watch the entire video. It’s very interesting. I think you’ll enjoy it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8F1_aqd47es

Lastly, though, I want to point out that Artificial Intelligence (AI) trained machines are already looking at scans and are detecting stuff a radiologist may not be able to. More of this is on the horizon. People are going to live longer, says Dr. Craig Spencer. Due to advancements in technology.

A basic computer chip is also responsible for saving lives. Doctors can target, collect data, and save information. Medicine is only going to improve over the next few decades and beyond!

About Zina

Zina Hermez authored the best selling book, Not Without God: A Story of Survival. Her second, Not Without God: Hope In the Storm will be out later this year. She’s been featured in numerous articles, guest posts, podcasts, websites, newsletters, and magazines. Recently she was featured on ESPN’s ‘Solutions from the Huddle’ broadcast and on ‘Color Speak,’ a Grace and Truth Radio World Podcast! Zina’s written hundreds of articles and has taught students from all over the world spanning many different backgrounds and cultures. Her writing endeavors earned her an invitation to speak at Harvard University’s, ‘Business Expert Forum’ and she’s appeared in Christianity Today, the Suite T blog and Southern Writers magazine among other places. She writes on faith, science, and overcoming adversity. Her goal is to help others. You can connect with her on Instagram, Facebook, Linked In, or Twitter.